According to WorldMeters, the total population of Australia is 24,479,316 as of today, and growing. With such a large audience based on a 7.692 million km² area, there will soon come a time when more and more residential and recreational projects will be imitated, leaving little to no natural greenery. This demands for an answer to one of the most important questions that all policymakers, developers and sustainable living consulting companies are digging their head into, “Are we prepared to cater to this high-density living?”

High-density living has become major concern for urban planners who are already grappling with the issues of traffic management, infrastructure development and housing problems. But apart from these physical concerns, there are many that need an urgent look. One of these includes the emerging need for greener spaces.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that city life isolates people from Mother Nature. Multiple recent researches have highlighted the harmful effects that isolation has on our lives. With the wellness or urbanities on stake, some clever thinking is in order to ensure a balance is created between natural beauty and humans in order to minimize the impact isolation it creates. The result of includes sustainable living methods and a better quality of life.

A solution to such isolation is bringing natural beauty to the city, but how? By making spaces greener! What spaces, you may ask? Whichever space is available!

Thankfully, city councils are now realizing the need for this and are introducing limited regulations on all new and developing projects to incorporate greenery in their infrastructural plans. To them, it will have a positive impact on the wellbeing of residents and employees, eventually enhancing the livability and resale value of the property.

One such office located in Martin place, Sydney has already designed their office to make it feel less office-like and more homely. Don’t be mistaken, we aren’t talking about Google, Facebook or Apple Inc., it is Dropbox who people are now calling the coolest office in Australia. With a private dining room, indoor patio, well-stocked bar, and an abundance of hanging and placed plants, it has become one of the most desirable workplaces to work at.

The interiors have been designed to give a homely feel with rugs, draperies, plants, bookshelves, Scandinavian-style wooden floors etc. to make the place feel extra cozy. Additionally, a surfboard, table tennis table and yoga mats for a relaxing session are also some featured in-house amenities.

According to the head of marketing of APAC & Japan, Deeps De Silva said, “The concept is bringing home into workplace. It’s very like an Australian living room.”

Lastly, plants, both small and big, can also be seen hanging by the windows, placed on the window sills and between cubicles to brighten the place with some additional colors. The overall impact is that it gives the office and airy and fresh feel and it is not something that you have to design yourself with companies that specialise in both supplying and designing green office spaces like www.theplantman.com.au. Hopefully, this effort will reap positive results and convince other organizations to follow suit.

https://i1.wp.com/geekcrunch.reviews/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/image-20160321-30946-embxbr.jpg?fit=754%2C566&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/geekcrunch.reviews/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/image-20160321-30946-embxbr.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Daniel JenningsCloud Computingbringing natural beauty to the city,Dedicated To Creating a Home-Like Office,designing green office spaces,Dropbox,enhancing the livability and resale value of the property,High-density living,Home-Like Office,It’s very like an Australian living room,making spaces greener,The concept is bringing home into workplace,the coolest office in Australia,wellbeing of residents and employeesAccording to WorldMeters, the total population of Australia is 24,479,316 as of today, and growing. With such a large audience based on a 7.692 million km² area, there will soon come a time when more and more residential and recreational projects will be imitated, leaving little to no natural...From A Geek to a Geek